Holy Ranunculus!

Up until a few months ago, I was blissfully unaware of the ranunculus plant.  I am a vegetable gardener.  I dream of plump eggplants, juicy tomatoes and crisp lettuce; I spend very little time thinking of flowers… or, at least, I spent very little time thinking of flowers.  Then I got engaged.  Then I discovered the billy-ball.  Then I discovered how long it takes to grow them and how finicky they are, and what a short window of time you have if you’re going to grow them yourself (read: they are beyond my capacity as a flower gardener).

And then, then I discovered the ranunculus.  I was okay; I didn’t have to have them myself; I assumed they were difficult to plant and even more difficult to produce.  But Charity over at Spade & Spatula convinced me otherwise, and now, now we might have a problem come spring.

Photo Courtesy of Bulbs Direct (Click on Photo to Link There)

Ranunculus are related to those precious little buttercups that run riot over our fields in the summer; however, they exceed the buttercup in terms of their ability to be cut and placed in bouquets.  I  will note that they are toxic (so we’re going to have to keep the girls away from them!), but given the number of foxes we’ve seen this spring, all free ranging is going to have to be limited to the chicken tractors for the foreseeable future.

After weeks of salivating, I must admit that I did just place an order with Dutch-owned BulbsDirect.  There are 120 ranunculus bulbs in my future… but I warn you, browse at your own risk!  The combination of cabin fever and bright spring flowers is deadly!

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